“Quilts and Color: The Pilgrim/Roy Collection” at the MFA

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Off Center Log Cabin Barn Raising Quilt 1890 Foundation pieced printed plain weave cotton top, printed plain 
weave cotton back * Pilgrim / Roy Collection Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

I just wanted to share a bit of local news for those who live in the greater Boston area and for those of you who might be planning a trip here. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston will be opening an exhibit called “Quilts and Color: The Pilgrim/Roy Collection” this spring. The exhibition of 59 distinctive quilts is the first to explore how, over five decades, artist and designer Gerald Roy, who now lives in New Hampshire, and the late Paul Pilgrim acquired bold, eye-popping quilts that frequently echo the work of mid-20th century Abstract and Op Artists. The exhibition not only looks at the quilts themselves, but also examines how color theory relates to their designs. Pilgrim and Roy began collecting in California, and their lifelong passion for quilts led them to amass one of the finest collections in the world, numbering over 1,200 examples from across the United States. Many were created by anonymous women from diverse communities stretching from 19th-century Massachusetts and Amish and Mennonite Pennsylvania to Depression-era Missouri. Quilting gave them a voice in a time when there were few opportunities for women to express themselves artistically.

Tumbler's Quilt	American, Pennsylvania, about 1920	Pieced wool twill top, cotton plain weave flannel back, cotton plain weave binding; quilted	*Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  Mary S. and Edward J. Holmes Fund	*Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Tumbler’s Quilt American, Pennsylvania, about 1920 Pieced wool twill top, cotton plain weave flannel back, cotton plain weave binding; quilted *Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Mary S. and Edward J. Holmes Fund *Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

On view April 6–July 27, 2014 in the Ann and Graham Gund Gallery, each section of the exhibition (and the accompanying publication) is introduced by abstract works of art—one painting and seven prints by artists such as Josef Albers, Victor Vasarely and Sol LeWitt—that offer a modern look at color theory. The accompanying publication also explores the history of quilting as it rose beyond its utilitarian and decorative roots to become a form of art in its own right.

I think that this exhibit would be a great guild field trip, don’t you?

Comments

  1. Sounds like a fascinating exhibition! The field trip costs may be a bit out of our league though…

  2. Amazing quilts! Wow! Its hard to believe that quilters in 1800s made quilts which we call Modern quilts in this day and age. Looks like fashion quilts history too comes back after 100s of years!

  3. A great exhibit; I cannot wait!

  4. I’ve been waiting for this exhibit ever since I first read about it.

  5. Amy, I would love to go see this at the MFA. Gerald came to speak at our Bedford Guild and we saw many of his quilts, they are lovely!

  6. I would love to go. Maybe win the lottery first….

  7. Amy, The To Boston with Love flags will be hung at the MFA again for the month of April.

  8. OOOO, wish I could out to Boston. But my family there will be sure to see this!
    Cat

  9. Hmmm… This may be a great mom/son day trip. My oldest, who is 10, has an amazing appreciation for art and always has a big input when I am designing the layouts for my quilts. Thanks for sharing this.

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