Revolution Quilt

Time has gotten away from me and it’s been almost two weeks since I shared a quilt from my new book, Improv Paper Piecing: A Modern Approach to Quilt Design. The book is available on Amazon and signed copies are in my Etsy shop (sent with a free postcard while supplies last!).  I love this photo.  And sharing it provides a good opportunity to thank my mom who came along with me to many of these photoshoots.  She helped me with this one, when I took photos in our Old Town Hall built in 1842 with its beautiful light and high ceilings.  The ladder was found in our barn when we moved into our house, the chair was found on the roadside and refinished by me, and the orchid is my husband’s.  That’s why these photos mean so much to me. They incorporate so many of the things I love and a lot of my personality.  I am grateful to have had the opportunity to take the photos for both of my books.

This photo was taken in the Everett Mill building in downtown Lawrence, MA. It was a former cotton mill and later shoe manufacturer. Again, my mom and her husband were with me, which was very helpful, especially when a big nail became imbedded in my tire and I had to carefully drive home with a flat. It was a beautiful space and I was able to take several photos there.

This quilt is based on the traditional Tallahassee block, sketched in an improvisational fashion with askew lines and asymmetry. Part of what makes this quilt successful is the layout. I placed the blocks in a sort of serpentine fashion, echoing the motion I felt from the block.  The colors are bold and the binding is another color all together–a fun bit of whimsy.

You can find this quilt pattern and related design exercise in the section of my book based on Traditional blocks. I hope you enjoy it!

Luminous Quilt

My local paper printed a really nice article about Improv Paper Piecing yesterday.  You can read the article here.  They chose the photo of my quilt, Luminous, for the article in the paper (all the photos I sent are in the online version but this was the image chosen for the printed paper).  I always love seeing what picture is chosen and how neat it is that everyone picks a different one!  This photo was taken at a local historic site, the John Greenleaf Whittier birthplace. Across the street from the white clapboard house, is a red barn. Beyond the barn is a cow pasture with this rusted gate and tall grass.  I normally avoid walking through tall grasses but risked the deer ticks for this shot.  You know, it’s always worth it for a pretty quilt picture.

The design of this quilt was inspired by the stars, a common source of inspiration for traditional quilters, as well.  But my stars are asymmetrical and less identifiable as stars.  They simply become interesting shapes.  Through the random coloration of each star and the rotation of the block throughout the quilt, the stars look unique. But, as you look at the quilt, your eye settles in on some of the more prominent shapes, such as the really wide, short arm of the star above, and you notice that it is repeated throughout.  Those interesting shapes direct your eye across the quilt.

I love the negative shapes created in-between the stars too.  They give the quilt some real energy!  I am excited to share my improv paper piecing design techniques at QuiltCon next week!

Edited to add: Yes, this pattern is available in my new book, Improv Paper Piecing: A Modern Approach to Quilt Design. It can be purchased in my Etsy shop or on Amazon. Also, be sure to ask for it at your local bookstore or quilt shop!

 

Peacock Crossing; A Sneak Peek from Improv Paper Piecing

I wanted to give you a little sneak peek from my book, Improv Paper Piecing.  I am told that Amazon will begin shipping mid next week!  You can preorder on Amazon or order directly from my Etsy shop.

This quilt is called Peacock Crossing and is from the Shape Based section.  The book is broken into three sections: traditional block based inspiration, shape based and object based.  I explain how you can use any of those approaches to arrive at improvisationally influenced paper pieced designs.  If you are going to Savannah for QuiltCon next week, you can visit this quilt in the Lucky Spool booth.

I have been able to share my book with a few early reviewers and love what Heather Grant had to say about Improv Paper Piecing,  She said “Amy’s quilts have always drawn me in because they are precise, yet organic. I couldn’t quite figure out how she managed this balance between two opposites until I picked up her book, Improv Paper Piecing. In this book, she outlines how to use paper piecing and improv to create quilts that are visually organized, yet free. This is a great book for any quilter looking to explore design using a technique to create one of a kind quilts.”  Pat Sloan will be sharing a review of my book on her blog next week so be sure to follow her!

I look forward to sharing more quilts in upcoming weeks!  If your guild is interested in an improv paper piecing workshop or trunk show, be sure to check out my Teaching/Lectures page and get in touch!

Arboreal Quilt


Arboreal Quilt by Amy Friend

I’m really happy with the way this quilt turned out!  I designed a paper pieced block using my improv paper piecing method.  The inspiration for my block design was the branching of a tree.  When I incorporated the mirror image of the block into the layout and then inverted every other row, I got this great repeating pattern.

Arboreal by Amy Friend

Admittedly, the finished quilt doesn’t scream tree branches, but I love that!  It does have a really cool organic feel to it due to its improvisational design roots.

Arboreal by Amy Friend

I have been wanting to make a quilt that incorporated cinnamon and pink for awhile now.  I love these colors…so adding mustard (another favorite) only made it better!  I colored and recolored the design in EQ7 until I hit upon this combination and it felt right. It certainly feels like fall to me so I am grateful that I was able to photograph it before the leaves were covered with snow.  The solids are a mix of Kona and Bella Solids and the cinnamon is a basic by Cotton + Steel with a tiny scattered dot.

Arboreal Quilting by Amy Friend

The quilting is straight line in 3 shades of Aurifil 50 weight thread. I matched the pink background fabric for the majority of the quilting using #2410 but I also stitched the occasional line in cinnamon and mustard. I love the subtle variation.

If you are intrigued by this design process, I encourage you to order my upcoming book, Improv Paper Piecing: A Modern Approach to Quilt Design. I explain my technique and provide a series of exercises to encourage you to design your own blocks. I think you will enjoy it!

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Shibori Quilt

Shibori by Amy Friend

I’m so excited to finally share this quilt. I had a hard time making time for it with my busy fall schedule but, tada, it’s done!

This quilt was designed using the improvisational paper piecing technique that I outline in my second book, Improv Paper Piecing, that will be published in February.  I am so excited to share this book with everyone and teach you my technique!

Shibori by Amy Friend

After much hemming and hawing, I have decided to name this quilt Shibori.  While the individual blocks suggest leaves, the repeat, especially colored in this gradient, feels a lot like tie dye or shibori to me.  My fabric selections are all Pure Elements solids from Art Gallery Fabrics.

Shibori by Amy Friend

The backing is a Cotton + Steel print from the Print Shop collection by Alexia Abegg.  I love not only the awesome color match but the modern feel of the print and it’s touch of whimsy that compliments the graphic design of the quilt front.

Shibori by Amy Friend

I often use solids when I really want my pattern design to take center stage, which is what I did here.  Then I find myself wishing I didn’t have to quilt because I don’t like quilting that takes away from that bold statement.  I find that straight lines are normally the best option because they don’t tend to detract and I end up liking the layer of added interest.  Here I quilted in vertical lines using Aurifil 2600 (a light gray that I love) and Aurifil 1147 (for a pop of green).  I used a 50 weight thread for the majority of the quilting which is spaced at 1/4″ and 1/2″ intervals, but the green pops are in 40 weight so they stand out a bit more.

The finished quilt measures 48″ x 56″.

Shibori by Amy Friend

I’m also appreciative that the foliage cooperated for these shots.  Had I finished even one week later, I would have missed that gorgeous color.

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Tumble ‘Round Quilt

Tumble 'Round Quilt by Amy Friend from Intentional Piecing

It’s poppy time of year.  In fact, I took this photo just one year and 5 days ago, the last time this field of poppies was in full bloom.  So, I thought it was fitting to share this quilt today!

I call this quilt Tumble ‘Round and the pattern can be found in my book, Intentional Piecing.  I think of this block as a spinning propeller of some sort and the feeling of motion is accentuated by the color placement in the “blades”, the directional print, and the concentric circle quilting.

Tumble 'Round Quilt by Amy Friend from Intentional Piecing
I was fortunate to be able to take some pictures at an antique auto collectors home.  This car was the perfect match and the owner was kind enough to drive it into his field of dandelions for me.  I love this shot!

Thanks for visiting! I hope your summer is off to a great start.

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Join Me on American Patchwork and Quilting

American Patchwork Quilting Pocast episode 301 Amy Friend

Tomorrow I will be talking with Pat Sloan on American Patchwork and Quilting Podcast about my book, Intentional Piecing. I hope you will join us!

Click here to listen tomorrow, May 2nd. The show time is 4pm Eastern, 3pm Central, 2pm Mountain, 1pm Pacific. Or, you can always listen later at your convenience!

The quilt in the image above is Crazy Eights from my book.  I loved designing and making that project.  I wanted to craft a design using stripes to create a dynamic design and am really pleased with the results.

Crazy Eights by Amy Friend from Intentional Piecing

Here is a bonus shot that didn’t make it’s way into the book. I was lucky to be able to use the antique Ford for the photo shoot.  I had fun quilting in concentric, overlapping circles.

More about the book tomorrow on the show!

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Possibilities

Fleet and Flourish Blog Hop

I’m so happy to be kicking off the Fleet and Flourish Blog Hop today to celebrate my friend Maureen’s new fabric collection for Art Gallery Fabrics. I love all the fabrics in this collection but her Roadside Guides print really caught my eye and inspired this quilt design. My quilt is made entirely of Pure Element Solids and backed in the Roadside Guides print.  I’ve named this quilt Possibilities.

Possibilities by Amy Friend
When I first saw this print, I knew I wanted to fussy cut it. I decided to do that in two sizes and made two corresponding blocks. I isolated just one log cabin design from the fabric and framed it with a solid for some of the blocks, and used groups of four fussy cut log cabins for the larger log cabin blocks.

Possibilities Quilt Top Detail, by Amy Friend

Because I love the fabric print on point, I designed the quilt so that my blocks are on point.

One of my personal challenges is to try to really mix up the colors I use for my quilt background fabrics–getting away from the safe white and greys. So here I used Pure Elements Grapefruit. I incorporated narrow sashing between blocks and irregular borders and played with the negative space around the edges, clipping the corners of the rectangle with my block placement.

As it turns out, the perfect Aurifil thread match for Pure Elements Grapefruit is #2420 Fleshy Pink. I used a 40 weight thread and stitched in diagonal lines spaced 1/2″ apart. I then stitched on the diagonal as well in the triangle formed in the negative space on the bottom left.

Possibilities with backing by Amy Friend

I bound the quilt in the background solid to keep the eye focused on the design and not to frame it. My finished quilt measures 55″ x 65″.

I completely loved making this quilt! Thanks for visiting. If you want to follow along with the blog hop, check out the following blogs in upcoming days:

Feb 22nd ~ Amy Friend : During Quiet Time { Blog & Instagram }  (you are here)
Feb 23rd ~ Heidi Staples : Fabric Mutt { Blog & Instagram }
Feb 24th ~ Amy Smart : Diary of a Quilter { Blog & Instagram }
Feb 25th ~ Amanda Jean: Crazy Mom Quilts { Blog & Instagram }
Feb 26th ~ Brooke Sellmann : Silly Mama Quilts { Blog & Instagram } Visit Maureen Cracknell Handmade for a Fleet & Flourish GIVEAWAY with Lady Belle Fabrics!!

Feb 29th ~ Amber Carillo : One Shabby Chick { Instagram & Blog }
March 1st ~ Nicke Cutler : Kiss Kiss Quilt { Instagram & Blog }
March 2nd ~ Nicole Daksiewicz : Modern Handcraft { Instagram & Blog }
March 3rd ~ Christopher Thompson : the Tattooed Quilter { Instagram & Blog }
March 4th ~ Alexis Wright : My Sweet Sunshine { Blog & Instagram } Visit Maureen Cracknell Handmade for a Fleet & Flourish GIVEAWAY with Llama Fabrics!!

March 7th ~ Jessica Stewart : Izzy & Ivy Designs { Blog & Instagram }
March 8th ~ Stephanie Kendron : Modern Sewciety { Blog & Instagram }
March 9th ~ Heather Bostic : House of A La Mode // Citizens of Textile { Instagram }
March 10th ~ Ali Brorsen : Because of Brenna { Blog, Facebook, & Instagram }
March 11th ~ Melissa Kelley : Sew Shabby Quilting { Blog, Facebook, & Instagram } Visit Maureen Cracknell Handmade for a Fleet & Flourish GIVEAWAY with the Intrepid Thread!!

March 14th ~  Maureen Cracknell Handmade { Blog, Facebook, & Instagram }

Barn Shot

If you want to see the whole collection of Fleet and Flourish, you can find it here.

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Scraps, Inc. Vol. 2: Fletching

Scraps, Inc. Vol 2 Cover

I loved contributing to the Scraps, Inc. Vol. 1 book so I was eager to make a quilt for the new Scraps, Inc. Vol. 2 as well!

Photo courtesy of Nydia Kehnle

Photo courtesy of Nydia Kehnle

My quilt is called Fletching because it is a highly stylized depiction of fletchings, or the feathers at the end of an arrow.  I really enjoyed settling on the color palette and digging through my stash for lots of scrappy prints.  Remember, a scrappy quilt can still have a palette, in fact, I think it’s often the key to success!  I used a mint green solid for my background and prints in apricot, coral, pink, muted blue, teal, grey and green.  While the block is a simple repeat, the color placement is not and it really adds interest to the quilt and makes the design more dynamic.

Fletching by Amy Friend

I love the way the quilting came out on this quilt.  I quilted with horizontal, evenly spaced lines, with the exception of one section where I echoed the fletching, zig-zag shape.  All the turning was a pain but so worth it!

Photo courtesy of Nydia Kehnle

Photo courtesy of Nydia Kehnle

For a limited time, you can order this book from Taunton for 30% off using the code Scraps30.  The discount is good through Tuesday, February 16th at midnight, no matter what your time zone.
The sale doesn’t end until 2 days after the  blog hop so you have a chance to preview all the quilts before you buy!

Monday, February 8

Amy Smart, Diary of a Quilter

Nydia Kehnle, Nydia Kehnle Design + Photography

Tuesday, February 9

Amy Friend, During Quiet Time

Alexandra Ledgerwood, Teaginny Designs

Wednesday, February 10

April Rosenthal, April Rosenthal – The {Studio} Blog

Dorie Schwarz, Tumbling Blocks

Thursday, February 11

Erin Harris, House on Hill Road

Janice Ryan, Better Off Thread

Friday, February 12

John Adams, Quilt Dad

Kari Vojtechovsky, Craft Happy

Saturday, February 13

Katie Blakesley, Swim Bike Quilt

Kati Spencer, From the Blue Chair

Sunday, February 14

Melissa Lunden, Lunden Designs

Allison Harris, Cluck Cluck Sew

Sherri McConnell, A Quilting Life

I have one copy of the book to giveaway. I will end the giveaway on February 15th…that way you can still take advantage of the discount if you are not the lucky winner!

I think you will love this book. Thanks for visiting!

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Wings Quilt

Wings Quilt by Amy Friend

I just finished this quilt that I am calling Wings.  While designing it, I found myself referring to the elongated triangles as wings, and the black triangles that are present in some of the triangle sets as “beaks.”  I then arranged the triangles in flocks of birds flying in the same direction.  There is a slight change of course in the second row (the watermelon colored block 4th from the left).  Where that bird turns and pushes through the wind heading in the opposite direction, the quilting changes too.  From the tip of that bird out, the quilting is a diagonal grid.  To the left of that bird, the quilting is only on the diagonal.

Wings by Amy Friend, quilting detail

You may be able to see the quilting detail better in this picture.  When planning the diagonal grid, rather than starting at opposing corners, I followed the lines of the wings so that the shapes produced would be elongated diamonds to correspond to the elongated triangles that form the wings.  The prints that have strong directionality were carefully cut to echo the wing shape and enhance the feeling of motion. You can see that most clearly with the Cotton + Steel black and white stripe, but also the AGF Squared Elements print to the left of it and the Heavy Metal print in to the far right in the center row.

I was speaking with my former colleague, architectural historian Victoria Solan, about this quilt. She pointed out that the suggestion of motion, that I worked to include in this quilt, is characteristic of mid-century modernism in America.  She cited Eero Saarinen’s TWA Terminal from 1962 as an example. What I love about this example is that it too was intended to suggest flight in an abstract manner.

spaulding dinner ware set mid century melamine pace setting

1950’s Melamine Set, photo used with permission from CollectibleCorner.

The color palette that I used is reminiscent of mid-century modern melamine. My grandmother had a set of these dishes that my mom grew up using, and then we used them for years when I was a kid.  I will confess that this association was not purposeful when I selected the colors. I was going for a particular feeling, which I can now see was very mid-century modern in color as well.

The quilt has a certain feeling of whimsy due to the simplified palette and the fabric choices. I included a quirky Japanese print with little bunnies sitting on the moon as well as a Cotton + Steel print with smiling clouds.  Vicky said that it appears that, “Charley Harper seeped into your conscious.”  I love that association.  His American Modernist designs were inspired by nature but pared down to their simplest form; bold shapes like triangles, squares and circles. His work is often described as colorful, bold, minimal and whimsical.

Wings Quilt backing by Amy Friend

I used Caroline Hulse’s To Live by Love text print for the back of the quilt, from her Happy Home collection for Art Gallery Fabrics.

The finished quilt measures 48″ x 54″.

 

Ombre Vibes Mini

Ombre Vibes Mini by Amy Friend

A little over a year ago now, I designed a quilt for Sizzix that I called Ombre Vibes. It is available as a free pattern on the Sizzix site.  Sizzix now owns the sample quilt that I made and I have been intended to make one for myself but keep putting it off.  I was asked to teach an Ombre Vibes quilt class this fall so I figured it was now time to make another version!  Sizzix is kindly sending the original for me to share at the class so I made this sample to share another colorway, a smaller size, and a different quilting approach.

Ombre Vibes Mini by Amy Friend

The original Ombre Vibes was made with 6″ finished squares and HST units.  This mini version is half the size using 3″ finished squares and HST units.  It finishes at 27″ square.

Ombre Vibes Mini by Amy Friend

It can be tricky to find 6 solids in a nice gradient.  I chose to start with a FQ pack of Pure Elements by Art Gallery Fabrics and added in the lightest shade of pink for the center and one of the medium pink shades from a Kona bundle in order to achieve the gradient I needed.  The grays are all Kona.  I was so thrilled to find the perfect binding fabric in my stash!  It’s Tula Pink’s Swarm in Jam.  Not only does it match the darkest shade of pink but it includes one of the medium shades too!

Ombre Vibes Mini by Amy Friend

For my original Ombre Vibes, I quilted with tiny pebbles in the center square and then quilted wavy radiating lines from the center to the outer edges.  In order to show a quilting alternative, and since this one was smaller and therefore this approach more feasible, I quilted with a dense diagonal grid.  The lines are all 1/4″ or 1/2″ apart.  They are primarily quilted with a 50 weight Aurifil in light pink but I added some rows of gray stitches too. I think you can see this if you look closely.

I hope you are all enjoying summer!

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Improv Handbook Blog Hop

ImprovHandbook91386J

Welcome to the Improve Handbook Blog Hop! Sherri Lynn Wood’s new book, The Improv Handbook for Modern Quilters; A Guide to Creating, Quilting & Living Courageously, has just started shipping. I had the pleasure of meeting Sherri this past weekend when she visited my guild to teach her Bias Strip Curves class. You can read about that experience in my earlier post.

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The book is full of beautiful photographs by Sara Remington–including the cover shot and the picture of Sherri (both above). The staging is sparse, putting the quilts on center stage.

I really like the way Sherri speaks about improvisation. I appreciate technique and skill and respect those who exhibit both in their work. She suggests that improv has it’s own set of techniques and skills. I think those who have never tried improv might be quick to disagree with that statement but if you have given it a go, you will know that there is much technique and skill involved in putting away that ruler. She speaks to that and provides hints and tips for fixing problem areas in your work such as puckers and pulls and how to avoid them or work with them. I also like that Sherri states that the maker is the most important part of improvisation. You have to know yourself and your likes and dislikes, feel your emotions, etc. I think working on a improv piece is just that for me. I love to work intuitively and make decisions as I go.  I also feel like my decisions are more visible in improv than they are in other types of sewing. You kind of bare your soul.

Sherri’s book contains 10 scores. She uses scores as a vehicle for teaching improvisation. I see her scores as guidelines, broad rules to follow that start you on your way to improv. The rules can be interpreted differently by different individuals, as you will see if you look at the many test quilts that were made for this book. I think these scores make improv much less intimidating to beginners. Most people who sew are used to patterns and following directions. Sherri has provided you with direction enough to make you feel comfortable, with room enough for you add yourself into the equation, in fact, you are forced to.  You have to make decisions because the answers are not all there.

More than a year ago now, I received an email from Sherri asking me to consider making a quilt using one of her scores for her upcoming book. She asked me to work with the Layered Curve score which, broadly speaking, had me collect fabric, handcut curves, and reassemble, all without a ruler.  I was really pleased when she chose my quilt for the book. I thought I would walk you through my process today.

 

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The blocks above were my first attempt in following the score.

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Then I layered them and cut more curves.  I quickly decided that I didn’t like the direction that I was heading in.  The quilt was way too busy for my taste and the curves were not elegant enough or balanced.

I decided to start again with a set of solids in a very limited range and, in addition to the score, set another rule for myself. I would cut an inner 1/4 circle type curve in the corner of each section.

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I realized that I didn’t have any photographs of my finished quilt this winter and Sherri’s book was due out in February.  In an attempt to get ready for the blog hop, I actually had to borrow snow shoes to walk over the several feet of snow in our Massachusetts yard to get pictures.  Who knew that the publishing would be delayed?  I could have taken them without storm interference but you had better believe that I am sharing the snowy pictures after that monumental effort!  Plus, it’s more amusing.

Scrambled by Amy Friend

This is my final quilt. I named it Scrambled.  Sherri refers to the 1/4 circle shape I employed as a yolk like shape.  It definitely is that though it wasn’t my intent and the name of the quilt came later.  The curves in this quilt feel much more elegant and calmer.  It’s more “me” if you will than my first attempt.  I allowed the quilt to remain in it’s wavy, non squared up shape which I like as well.

Scrambled by Amy Friend

The quilt top posted here did not follow a score in Sherri’s book but I think it was informed by the skills I learned when working with the Layered Curve score. It gave me the confidence to attempt such a large improv piece. I also stuck to what I knew I liked best from this experience-mostly solids (though I included one print) and again I made rules, or scores, for myself which I explained in that post.

This book is a great springboard to improv piecing. I hope you will visit the other blogs on the hop to see some of the other beautiful quilts that were included in the book and all the test quilts as well.

May 1: STC Craft – Score for Rhythmic Grid Gallery

May 1: Sew Mama Sew – Score for Floating Squares Gallery

May 4: Plaid Portico – Score for Strings Gallery

May 6: During Quiet Time – Test Quilter Amy Friend

May 11: Studio Notes – Test Quilter Penny Gold

May 13: Quiltville – Score for Modern Block Improv Gallery

May 15: Peppermint Pinwheels – Test Quilter Stacey Sharman

May 18: Quirky Quilts – Test Quilter Kim McPeake

May 20: PoppyPrintCreates – Score for Patchwork Doodle Gallery

May 22: The Last Piece – Test Quilter Sara Fielke

May 25: Cauchy Complete – Score for Layered Curves Gallery

May 26Diary of a Quilter – Score for Bias Strip Petals Gallery

May 28: Getting Stitched on the Farm –Score for Improv Round Robin Gallery

May 29: Spoonflower – Score for Showing Up Gallery

May 30Fresh Modern Quilts – Test Quilter Rossie Hutchinson

The publisher, STC Craft/Melanie Falick Books, is offering one copy of this book to a resident of the US or Canada.  Please enter below for your chance to win.

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Improv Fans Mini Quilt

Improv Fans Mini by Amy Friend

Last week I worked on this mini for our Seacoast Modern Quilt Guild exhibit at this year’s The Gathering in Manchester, NH.  Our guild has been asked to create an exhibit that will give a clear idea of what constitutes modern quilting.  So, we are attempting to include only quilts that have alternate gridwork, negative space, solids, improv, bold colors, etc.  For one portion of the exhibit, each member has been asked to make a mini measuring 18″ or 22″ square.  They are to be modern takes on traditional blocks and use only solids.  We were assigned traditional blocks and mine was the Grandmother’s Fan. You can see a sample here.

Improv Fans Mini by Amy Friend

I decided to take an improvisational approach to the block. I chose a selection of Kona and Pure Elements solids based loosely on the Cotton + Steel color scheme.  I then handcut and randomly pieced a small fan and three larger arcs.

Improv Fans Mini by Amy Friend

I hand cut curves and sewed the arcs together. I squared up after adding each new arc.

Improv Fans Mini by Amy Friend

I had my quilting planned from the beginning. I quilted in arcs from the lower left to upper right corner, spaced 1/4″ apart.  Then I reversed the arc and quilted a wide band through the quilt in the opposite direction. I love how the lines crisscross and overlap and form diamonds.

Improv Fans by Amy Friend

I had so much fun with this mini!  While paper piecing is my go to technique, I love to mix it up once in awhile.  I’m looking forward to seeing what the other members of my guild come up with. I think it will be a fun portion of the exhibit and ALL members’ minis will be accepted so everyone has a chance to have their work shown in the exhibit.